Indoor Air Quality

3 Reasons Quiet Cool is a “MUST HAVE”

Reason #1 AIR CONDITIONING SAVINGS

Monthly Bill:

  • Save up to 50-90% on you monthly AC bill
  • Lowers the core temperature of your home
  • Induces thermal mass cooling
  • Exhausts heat pockets in the attic

HVAC System:

  • Reduces AC run time
  • Extends the systems life
  • Delay in the inevitable replacement or repair

When to run your Quiet Cool for Optimal Savings:

Run the system anytime the outside temperature is cooler than the inside temperature- typically when you get home from work in the evenings or in the early morning. You can run the fan on high for just a few minutes to exhaust the heat from your attic and then shift into the low setting to run throughout the night.

 

Reason #2 COOLING AND COMFORT

A Breeze on a Switch!

  • Instantaneous relief (moving air makes you feel 10°F cooler)
  • Consistent airflow
  • Balances upstairs and downstairs temperatures

When to run your Quiet Cool for Cooling and Comfort:

Run the system in accordance to your personal preference. Everyone is a little different but if you prefer a temperature of around 70°F- you will be able to turn on your fan when the outside temperature hits somewhere in the neighborhood of 80°F (because the air flow will automatically make you feel 10°F cooler).

 

Reason #3 VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY

Long Term Health Benefits:

  • The EPA reports that indoor air quality may be 2-5 times more polluted than outdoor air quality.
  • The American Medical Association reports that indoor air quality is directly responsible for up to 1/3 of our national health bill
  • Eliminates top causes of indoor air pollution such as VOC gases and toxins from the home by adding “active ventilation”
  • Completes air exchange in 3-4 minutes year round, regardless of outdoor temperature.

Everyday Common Tangible Air Quality Benefits

  • Eliminates dust, allergens, pollens and dander from the air
  • Eliminates kitchen and bathroom odors

When to run your Quiet Cool for Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality:

Run the system anytime the air quality is “good”. Outdoor air quality is easy to monitor in real time reports by visiting www. airnow.gov or by checking the local weather app. As long as the outside air quality is “good” you only need to run the fan for 3-4 minutes for a complete air exchange inside your home. This means you can run it regardless of the outside temperature – it doesn’t matter if its 22°F outside or 122°F because 3-4 minutes is not enough to induce thermal mass exchange . There is no better solution for the IAQ problem than running a complete air exchange with a Quiet Cool. We recommend doing that at least twice per week for a happy and healthy home.

 

Call us today to schedule an appointment for a Quiet Cool Whole House Fan. We serve Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder, Windsor, Wellington, and the surrounding areas. Schedule an appointment with an expert you can trust. Service delivered with pride! 970-399-9940

Indoor Air Quality

What is a Whole House Fan? How does it work?….. Better yet, How does it compare?

What are Whole House Fans?

A whole house fan is a ventilation cooling system that uses less energy than a traditional air conditioner. This energy-efficient system works by pulling cool, outdoor air into your home and out your attic vents. This helps keep the mass in your home cooler than an air conditioner can. These whisper-quiet and energy-efficient wonders are the #1 residential cooling & ventilation appliance on the market. With a whole house fan, you’re able to turn off your most expensive appliance, air conditioning, while improving the air quality and comfort of your home for just pennies per hour. A whole house fan system is installed in the ceiling between the attic and living space.

Whole House Fan vs Attic Fan

Whole house fans and attic fans are often confused. However, they are not the same thing.

A whole house fan is used for cooling both the home and attic. You typically run a whole house fan during the evening through into the early morning – basically any time it is cooler outside. This cools, ventilates, and exhausts all the hot, stale air in your home and attic. You would never run your whole house fan during the middle of the day when it is the warmest. This is where an attic fan comes in.

 

Attic fans ventilate and exhaust your attic only. You use them primarily during the day but they work well in the evening and night as well. They pull air from the outside through existing vents in your attic. This allows your attic to stay within 10ºF of the outside temperature at all times when the fan is running. Without an attic fan, your attic can get up to 150ºF during the summer, which can ruin the integrity of your home and cause high electric bills.

The best system combines an attic fan and a whole house fan to cool, ventilate, and exhaust the entire home, day and night, and year-round.

Attic Fans – Attic fans ventilate only the attic to reduce heat buildup and humidity, they operate year-round. Even during the winter months, homeowners can use an attic fan. In the winter, moisture and mold can build up due to the air in the home being very warm versus the air in the attic being very cold. The snow on the roof then becomes ice and holds the excess water. This is called ice damming and it is what creates mold, mildew, and premature roof rotting. With an attic fan, the constant flow of air in the attic lowers the overall humidity level and helps keep the attic healthy.

The best system combines an attic fan and a whole house fan to cool, ventilate, and exhaust the entire home, day and night, and year-round.

Whole House Fans – ventilate the whole house, including the attic and living space by bringing cool air from outside into the house to cool it and force the hot air out through the attic vents.

The whole house fan pulls air in from open windows and exhausts it through the attic and roof. It provides good attic ventilation in addition to whole house cooling. Whole house fans should provide houses with 3 to 6 air changes per hour (varies with climate, floor plan, etc.—check with our experts to determine what is appropriate for your home).

Whole House Fan vs Central Air and Window Units

Whole House Fans should never be used simultaneously with air conditioning of any kind – central air or window units. These systems can both reside in the same home and be used to complement one another.

Central Air Conditioning – cools the air with a chemical (like Freon) and circulates it within the house but does not pull in fresh air from the outside

Window AC Units – pull outside air and cools it with a chemical (like Freon)

Whole House Fans – Pull cool outside air into the house to cool it, then push the hot air in the house out through the attic

 

When to run your whole house fan:

When to use a Whole House Fan and how is a crucial aspect of receiving as many benefits as possible from these fans. The first important step is to ensure that the outdoor air is a temperature you would like in your own home. If it is, simply open 3-4 windows 2-3 inches wide and turn on your whole house fan. This process will flush in the outdoor air and flush out your stale, indoor air. You will have complete air exchange within 3-4 minutes!

 

Whole House Fan vs Ceiling Fans

Ceiling Fans – just move air around; they don’t pull in fresh or cooler air

Whole House Fans – Can improve the indoor air quality by filtering in fresh air and filtering out polluted air

Whole house fans combined with ceiling fans and other circulating fans provide acceptable summer comfort for many families, even in hot weather.

 

Call us today to schedule an appointment for a Quiet Cool Whole House Fan. We serve Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder, Windsor, Wellington, and the surrounding areas. Schedule an appointment with an expert you can trust. 970-399-9940

 

Indoor Air Quality

New and Improved Total Care Club Membership

 

ALL OF YOUR HOME SERVICE NEEDS UNDER ONE ROOF!

Over the years, Lion Home Service has added services in an attempt to make our clients’ lives easier. We know that everyone is busy and our goal has always been to offer full home services, so that you only have to make one call to a company you trust.

 

OUR MEMBERSHIP JUST GOT BETTER!

We are now offering Roofing, Gutter, Indoor Air Quality, Safety and Septic annual assessments in addition to all the other assessments we have always offered our membership!

Heating, Cooling, Electrical, Plumbing, Drains, Indoor Air Quality, Safety, Roofing, Gutters, and Septic

Total Care Club Memberships will cover preventative maintenance assessments for Heating, Cooling, Electrical, Plumbing, Drains, Indoor Air Quality, Safety, Roofing, Gutters, and Septic services.

NOW EVEN MORE BENEFITS!

  • Free Estimates – we will gladly assess any repair needs within your plan and provide estimates at no additional charge to you for the duration of your club membership
  • Guaranteed Response Time
  • Priority Scheduling – Whether you’re calling for routine maintenance or emergency service, you will receive the earliest available scheduling.
  • 15% Member Rate Discount– 15% Off of Septic Pumping and ALL Repairs!*
  • Money Saving Coupons – that never expire
  • Maintenance Assessments
  • 24/7 Great Service Discount – emergencies don’t always happen when it’s convenient, rest assured knowing Lion Home Service is there when you need us. If you require emergency service, you will never pay a premium fee after hours.
  • Fast 0% Down, 0% Interest Financing Available

All for the same low cost!

1 Year and 1 month FREE- Total 13 months $299

2 Years and 1 Year FREE- Total 3 years! $499

3 Years and 2 Years FREE- Total 5 Years! $699 BEST VALUE !!

Heating

  • Check all the burners for proper operation
  • Check thermocouple for proper operation
  • Check the flue pipe
  • Check the inducer and blower motors
  • Check and tighten all electrical connections
  • Check the safety switch and controls
  • Check the pilot assembly
  • Check temperature and pressures
  • Check thermostat for proper operation
  • Check drain lines and traps for proper function
  • Testing and labeling of emergency shut-offs
  • Check gas valve
  • Check zone valves
  • Check expansion tank
  • Check aquastat, relay and water regulator
  • Check air flow across indoor coil and blower wheels
  • Check duct work for leaks
  • Start and test operation and cycle of unit
  • Check air flow
  • Check humidifier/dehumidifier

Cooling

  • Check condenser coil
  • Check evaporator coil
  • Check blower motor
  • Check refrigerant charge
  • Check and tighten all electrical connections
  • Check temperature and pressures
  • Check thermostat for proper operation
  • Check and labeling of emergency shut-offs
  • Check controls and safety devices
  • Check capacitors
  • Check condensate drain
  • Check relays and contactors for proper operation
  • Check duct work for leaks
  • Check proper amperage and voltage of A/C system
  • Start and test operation and cycle of unit
  • Check air flow
  • Check humidifier/dehumidifier

Indoor Air Quality

  • Free Annual Radon Test
  • Filter Inspection
  • Duct work inspection – video/pictures
  • Insulation Inspection

Electrical

  • Main Panel Check Up
  • Check all wiring in main panel for proper sizing
  • Check breakers and fuses for proper operation
  • Check outside meter and enclosure
  • Check outside main feeders
  • Check ground fault protection for proper operation
  • Check surge protectors
  • Check attic fans for proper operation
  • Check exhaust fans for proper operation
  • Testing of circuit breakers
  • Check all accessible lights, switches, dimmers, receptacles, ceiling fans
  • Check all main service grounding and tighten as needed
  • Check any outside and inside disconnects

Plumbing & Drain Cleaning

  • Check Water Pressure
  • Field Test Drinking Water
  • Check Washing Machine Hoses
  • Check all faucets for leaks to ensure proper operation
  • Dye test toilets to check for leaks to ensure proper operation
  • Check all drains for proper flow
  • Check garbage disposals for proper operation
  • Check all emergency shutoff valves for proper operation
  • Labels all main shutoffs at locations
  • Check main water meter
  • Check all outside spigots

Safety Inspection

  • 10 -Point Fire Safety check which includes but not limited to:
  • Check Carbon Monoxide alarms
  • Check Smoke Alarms
  • Check main disconnects

ROOFING*

  • 21-Point Roof Inspection
  • Photos taken on inside and outside of the roof with attic assessment

GUTTERS

  • 17- Point Gutter Inspection

SEPTIC*

  • 15-Point Septic Assessment – Includes but not limited to:
    • Check tank liquid levels
    • Tank construction and structural integrity
    • Access point structural integrity
    • Inlet/Outlet Tees and baffles
    • Checking for any cracks/leaks

During the year, your Lion Service Expert will perform a plumbing, electrical, heating, air conditioning, roofing, gutter, and septic assessments. These assessments allow you to protect your home’s investments by ensuring all systems are running and performing correctly – saving you money on costly repairs!
For more information about starting your Total Care Club Membership, call 970-399-9940

*15% member discount does not apply to new roof installations or new septic installations. 15% off is applied to roofing repairs, septic pumping & repairs, Hvac installations and other inside repair services.

Indoor Air Quality

Improve Your Indoor Air Quality with These Simple Tips

When it comes to protecting your family’s health, we all want to take it seriously. However, the Environmental Protection Agency has news that may surprise you –the air quality in your house can be more contaminated than the air outside, even in big cities where there is more pollution!

Studies show that most Americans spend nearly 90% of their lives indoors. While you’re there, do you want to be breathing in air that’s just as dirty as the air outside? Of course not! It’s your home, it’s your air quality, it’s your lungs.

But don’t fret as there are steps that you can take to improve the air quality within your home.

Knowing Your Invisible Enemies

The first step to improving the air quality in your home is to determine what pollutants are causing potential serious damage to your health. The Environmental Protection Agency says these indoor pollutants can be classified into three categories:

  1. Combustion Pollutants: Common combustion pollutants include carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide. These colorless and odorless gases originate from burning objects that are incorrectly vented or not vented at all. The type and number of pollutants created depends on the installation, maintenance, and ventilation of the appliance, as well as the type of fuel it utilizes.
  2. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC): These organic chemicals disseminate as gases that came from particular solid or liquid materials which most likely are the household products you often use.
  3. Triggers to Asthma and Other Allergies: You may not know it, but your home may be host to a culture of dust mites on your blankets, pillows, or stuffed toys, mold on shower curtains, and cat or dog hair all over floors or upholstery which can trigger nasty allergy or complications due to asthma.

Limit Your Exposure

Now that you know your invisible enemies, it is time that you drastically cut down your exposure to it.

  • Let fresh air come inside and ventilate your home by opening your windows as often as possible.
  • Change or clean air filters regularly –especially the ones from your air purifier, furnace or heater, vacuum, and air conditioner.
  • Humidity levels are important in controlling the growth of mold and mildew. Set up your home’s humidity level to an ideal 45%. A humidity level below 30% is too dry while over 50% can make your home too moist making it an open breeding ground for molds. You may want to use a humidifier or a room vaporizer to increase the humidity in your home. To decrease it, open your windows, use your fan, dehumidifier, or air conditioner.
  • Go natural with DIY air fresheners and avoid synthetic ones that emit damaging chemicals or hormone disruptors.
  • Use a HEPA air purifier that doesn’t generate ozone and eliminates VOCs from furniture, paint, or cleaning materials.
  • Go green by planting green plants in your home, particularly those from a list supplied by your friends at NASA. These can help lessen VOCs and enhance the air quality of your home.
  • Set a regular grooming schedule for your pets.
  • When painting your home, only use the kind that has low or no VOC and always pick non-toxic adhesive, finishes, and varnishes as much as possible

Be Clean, Be Smart.

To improve the air quality in your home, how you clean and what you use to clean really matters.

Reduce Dust and Pollutants

A high-performance vacuum with powerful suction, HEPA filters, and rotating brushes can be a very good investment as it catches tiny particles that regular vacuums often miss. Do this once a week and make sure to regularly wash or change your vacuum filter. If you don’t have time for regular vacuuming, consider an automatic vacuum that does the job for you.

Use a damp cloth to wipe the tops of window frames, doors, and sills, and wash your curtains often. You may buy a reusable microfiber dust mop to reach nooks and crannies that vacuum could not.

Use quality mattress, pillow, and box spring covers that are dust-mite-proof.

And to prevent against the growth of mold, of which spores can be toxic, use environmentally-friendly materials when cleaning your shower and regrout your tiles if needed.

Stop Using Aerosols

The use of aerosols has long been believed to harm the environment, as well, and it does. Most fragranced products are derived from petroleum products which are non-renewable, polluting resources.

Products such as air freshener, deodorant spray, furniture polish, hair spray and carpet cleaner all contain artificial fragrances that often contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are considered toxic or hazardous. And all the product label has to state is that the product contains “fragrances,” so you’ll never know when there is actually a deadly chemical hidden in there.

Releasing them into the air causes an irreversible negative effect on the environment.

So what can you do? Stop using aerosol products. Opt, again, for homemade products to replace them using all-natural ingredients, or choose fragrance-free products.

Let the Outdoors In

Open a window in your house! Letting in some fresh air will not only combat the potentially deadly pollutants that have been emitted into the air in your home unknowingly, but it can be a natural way to cool your home during warmer months, too.

Depending on where you live (cities and highly populated areas tend to have poorer air quality than the suburbs and open country spaces), the air quality outside may actually be better than that inside your home. The fresh air can help clear out the polluted air that you’re breathing indoors.

And if it tends to heat up quickly in your home, instead of turning on the air conditioning immediately when it warms up outside, try opening the windows for a natural breeze to flow throughout your home to cool it off. You’ll save tons of energy this way and it’s really an effective cooling technique (assuming you get a good air flow). Check out the Quiet Cool Whole House Fans for AC alternatives to cooling and fresh air options

Decorate With Plants

Just as plants outside filter the air we breathe, indoor plants can help improve the air quality within your home, as well.

Decorate using strategically placed air-filtering house plants throughout your home. They have capabilities of filtering out any pollutants that may be in the air in your home and return to you clean, breathable air.

House plants are also said to have an effect on mood and the general feeling of overall well-being. The bottom line: plants are good for you and good for the environment on all levels, so adding them to your home will only help improve your life and the air that you breathe!

TEST FOR RADON

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. The EPA says that radon moves up from the ground into homes through cracks and holes in the foundation. It is estimated that one in fifteen homes in the U.S. have elevated radon levels.

The health risks from living with radon stem from breathing radioactive particles that become trapped in the lungs and can result in tissue damage, which can lead to lung cancer over a lifetime. However, not everyone exposed to higher levels of radon will develop lung cancer.

The EPA and the Surgeon General recommend indoor air quality testing for radon in all homes below the third floor

The EPA recommends taking a test as the first step. If you find that your radon level is 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) or greater on a regular basis then fixing your home would be the next step by adding a Radon mitigation system.

There are many proven methods to reduce the radon level in your home, and the primary way is by using a vent pipe system and fan. The cost will depend on your home, but for most, it can be fixed for about the cost of a simple home repair. Lowering radon levels requires technical knowledge and skills, and it is best to work with a contractor who has been trained to fix radon problems. Let us know if Radon has been a problem in your home.

RELY ON TRUSTED PROFESSIONALS

Finally, For your home to be a safe haven for your family and to ensure their health, you must improve the air quality inside it! Hopefully these tips will put you on the track to a greener, healthier home , if you need help, Lion Home Service can take care of all your indoor air quality. We service all of Northern Colorado in Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Boulder, Windsor and surrounding areas. Call us today! 970-399-9940 .

 

 

Indoor Air Quality

5 Tips to Reduce the Effects of Wildfire Smoke With Your Home’s HVAC

This year has brought unprecedented wildfires to the Western United States, and Colorado has been no exception. The fires here have created a blanket of smoke and ash over our Northern Colorado communities and many of our neighbors are concerned about what this means for their indoor air quality. Today, we’ll share some ways your HVAC system can help stave off the harmful effects of the outside air when wildfire smoke causes a sharp increase in pollutants.

1 – Close Windows & Doors

While it may seem obvious, keeping your home’s windows and doors sealed as often as possible is the best way to keep the harmful air from circulating in your home. While this likely isn’t always possible for your household, ensuring that nobody in the family is sleeping with the window cracked or frequently coming and going, for instance, can go a long way toward ensuring the entire home is exposed to as little outdoor air as possible and allows the HVAC to cycle cleaner air throughout the home.

Another thing to consider is sealing any known cracks or gaps in your home’s windows or doors with a damp towel. In ordinary times, we’d recommend upgrading your windows or doors to new energy-efficient models, but letting the smoke in during the replacement process would likely cause more short-term harm than good when compared to waiting until after fire season.

2 – Keep Exhaust Fans Off

One aspect folks rarely consider connecting their home to the outdoors is the exhaust fans often found in kitchens or bathrooms, as well as whole-house fans. Any system that requires pulling indoor air out will eventually need to balance out with outdoor air coming in. So, by running the bathroom or above-the-oven exhaust fans, you’re inadvertently inviting in outdoor air.

In general, one of the best defenses your home has against harmful air pollutants outside, such as allergens, pollution, or even wildfire smoke is to keep air sealed inside. If your family can go without using the gas range stovetop or taking lengthy showers through the worst days of the fires, you’ll be thankful for the higher air quality that keeping the exhaust fans off will afford.

3 – Seal AC Intake Vents

In a similar vein, your home’s forced-air HVAC system would typically utilize air intake vents to bring fresh air from the outdoors into your home while your air conditioner is running. During days with particularly bad wildfire smoke, these vents can work to bring in pollutants and cause more harm than good in addition to overworking your system.

If you’re unsure about where to find your system’s air intake vents or whether or not you should disable them, get in touch with the team at Lion Home Service for advice or a service appointment.

On a related note, there is typically no way to disable air intake on an air conditioner window unit, so our team does not recommend the normal use of window units during poor outdoor conditions.

4 – Change the Air Filter (More) Frequently

If you’ve read our other posts, you’ll likely understand that we often recommend checking and changing air filters on your home’s HVAC. During a fire, we strongly suggest that Northern Colorado residents check and change air filters far more frequently than normal. Since many of the harmful air particles in wildfire smoke are very fine, a worn-out air filter could only show minor discoloration compared to the norm.

If you notice anything other than a great-looking air filter in your furnace, check to ensure that your home is sealed as much as possible and prepare to regularly change your air filter. Even if your filter does look pretty good, it wouldn’t hurt to change it once or twice more than normal during long bouts of wildfire smoke in our area. A dirty or clogged air filter will cause your system to overwork and could allow particles to cycle through the system repeatedly, which pumps that air into your home.

5 – Incorporate an Upgraded Filter

If you’d like to know for sure that your home’s air is as purified as possible, we recommend a germicidal and oxidizing UVC air filtration system. This add-on to your furnace will work round-the-clock to filter out particles floating in the air within your home. During a wildfire, this added protection will make a noticeable difference in your home’s indoor air quality.

These systems work to remove common air particles, such as particles, allergens, germs, airborne diseases, chemical gases, odors, pet dander, smoke, and more. So, you can rest assured in knowing that your air filtration will provide lasting value even when the outdoor air is back to normal.

Check out our indoor air quality products and services and be sure to let us know if you have any questions on the best system for your home or would like a consultation appointment with one of our Northern Colorado HVAC service experts.

Indoor Air Quality

Sore Throat from Wildfires? Invest in Indoor Air Quality

Wildfires have always been a problem for Northern Colorado residents, but never quite to the degree that we’ve seen these past few years. In fact, 2020 alone saw a record-setting blaze drape the entire front range in a choking, orange haze. Couple this with the Coronavirus outbreak forcing more of us indoors for longer periods of time, and you have a recipe for very poor indoor air quality.

How Wildfires in the Mountains Impact Your Home’s Air

A few weeks back from this writing, it may have been more difficult to convince Northern Colorado residents of the direct impact fires have on our communities and in the air of our homes, but the recent fire season has likely proven that point for us to some degree.

But just what is going on? Why and how does smoke outside of our homes cause a drop in our indoor air quality?

Fires Create Dangerous Outdoor Air

Here’s where we tell you what you already know: during a wildfire, surrounding areas are likely to have dangerous outdoor air. While that’s not a shocker to local residents, what may come as a surprise is just how much worse the air can get.

Under normal conditions, we enjoy impressively-clean outdoor air when considering the size of the metropolitan area in Northern Colorado.

During a wildfire, however, that can jump dramatically in the other direction.

For example, a normal AQI (Air Quality Index) for Fort Collins is around 20-30. During a nearby wildfire, that number jumped to over 200. As you can imagine, lower is better on this scale. Check out the Colorado Air Quality Report from the Department of Public Health & Education to see today’s conditions, as well as those in recent days.

To put this into perspective, that’s worse than an average day in Dubai, the most polluted city on the planet.

Since our residents are obviously unaccustomed to this level of air pollutants and, in many cases, have not employed solutions against this level of air quality, wildfires can pose a serious health risk.

Some Outdoor Air Will Get In

Despite the massive leap forward we’ve taken in constructing homes with energy-efficient windows, doors, siding, roofing, and more, particles from the outside still find their way into even the most well-constructed homes. While you should try to keep windows and doors closed as much as possible, it is important to recognize that alone will not be enough to keep all outdoor contaminants out.

During a wildfire, this means that your indoor air quality will also drop as a result of the added particles present in the outdoor air.

These particles can cause or irritate the following, even if you remain indoors:

  • Burning eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Headaches
  • Illnesses, such as bronchitis
  • Agitate chronic conditions, such as asthma, allergies, and certain heart and lung diseases

Wildfires Have Become More Likely

Colorado climate scientists say that we should expect to see more wildfires like we’ve seen in 2020, according to reporting from Colorado Public Radio. Anecdotal, anyone that’s lived in Northern Colorado for a decade or more can attest that fires have been more likely to start and have burned for longer in recent years than any in memory.

This is likely due to Colorado’s average temperatures rising and the driest parts of the year being even more dry than usual. This recipe creates the perfect conditions for wildfires to start (and continue) across the state.

We’re Spending More Time At Home

Under normal conditions, the top pollutant in most homes would be its residents. Dust from skin and hair combines with chemicals and other contaminants from our possessions to create contaminants that can swirl around in the air for far longer than you’d like to imagine.

Since we’re now spending more time at home than ever amidst the coronavirus pandemic, the indoor air quality of our homes is likely at a lower spot than it normally would be when parents are off at work and children are spending time outdoors or in school.

Couple this together with choking smoke from a wildfire, plus the contaminants in the air entering our homes anyway, and you have a recipe for far worse indoor air than you may have come to expect from your home.

We Can Help

At Lion Home Services, we’re happy to help homeowners increase their home’s indoor air quality with our Whole House High-Efficiency Air Cleaner systems. We use solutions for trapping or eliminating the VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) in your home to greatly reduce the contaminants in the indoor air.

Check out everything our team has to offer your home and decide if an indoor air quality addition to your home’s existing HVAC could be just the thing to keep your home’s air fresh and clean regardless of what is happening in the world outside.

Find your next indoor air quality solution today!

Indoor Air Quality

Indoor Air Quality Means More Now Than Ever

With the current state of affairs in the world, we tend to think of our homes as a safe haven away from the big bad coronavirus lurking just outside the door. While this may be true to an extent, the quality of the air inside your home matters now more than ever. We are only seeing the beginning effects of what has been labeled a pandemic in the US.

In record numbers, sporting events and gatherings are being canceled, hand washing has become a hot button issue, and the threat of Covid -19 is looming large over all of us in Fort Collins. Even though we have not had a large number of cases locally, state and local officials are working to contain any exposure there may be.

Employers are having their employees work from home; Fort Collins area schools are preparing for the worst; and we can look forward to a world without professional sports this year. It is looking like this is no joke and we all need to take it seriously.

This disruption does mean a big change in all of our lives over the next few months. Really, who knows how long we are going to be under the threat of this virus. This means you are probably going to be spending much more time at home, so wouldn’t you like to be sure of your indoor air quality?

At Lion Home Service, we are just as concerned about the possibility of this virus spreading as you are, and we do not want any of our employees or clients to become sick. While minimizing indoor pollutants is important at any time, it brings the concern of the air inside your home into much more focus.

Your home should be an oasis from the outside world, a safe haven where you can breathe easy and not have to worry about inhaling contaminants.

The Air In Your Home May Be Dirtier Than You Think

Indoor air pollution can contribute to respiratory illness and other short- or long- term health effects, but with a few simple maintenance items your indoor air quality can be improved. Of course, there are a few sources of indoor air pollution that are not going to be as easy to eradicate.

Depending on how old your home may be, there are a wide variety of building materials that produce harmful substances. These can range from formaldehyde to asbestos, and when these are present, it is crucial to develop a plan of action to deal with these pollutants as they are very difficult to mitigate.

As far as day-to-day pollutants, a properly functioning HVAC system will minimize the presence of indoor air pollutants and keep your family safe. At Lion Home Service we have some of the best service service experts in the industry, the local experts in ensuring that you have a safe heating and cooling system in your home.

While it is impossible to prevent all forms of indoor air pollution, a properly functioning HVAC system can ensure that the air circulating in your home is as clean as possible.

Carbon Monoxide

A product of combustion, carbon monoxide is a harmful gas that is very difficult to detect and could result in serious health problems. Carbon monoxide can be present in a poorly functioning heater or heater components. Thankfully many homes are now equipped with carbon monoxide detectors and modern furnaces include safeguards to prevent carbon monoxide issues.

Duct Work

Duct work stretches throughout much of your home and sends cooled or heated air to the far reaches of your living space. Over time, these ducts become a resting place for bacteria, dust, and sometimes mold. While changing your filter will help, the majority of contaminants that find their way into your ducts enter through your vents and can be difficult to remove.

Filters

Your HVAC filter is the first line of defense for your indoor air quality. While filters may vary in terms of quality, the principle is the same — to catch particles from the air and prevent them from circulating in your home. A good filter can block particles all the way down to bacteria, but keep in mind that filtering out tiny particles like that would mean an air-tight system and your HVAC is not completely airtight so filter effectiveness is subjective.

Through furnace maintenance, duct cleaning, and filter service, Lion Home Services specializes in creating an environment so that you can feel safe inside of your home. This is all the more critical when we are faced with a potentially terrible situation due to the coronavirus.

If you need to schedule routine maintenance, a filter change, or duct cleaning, please contact us today and we will do our part to make you more comfortable in your home. We hope you stay safe during this period and please use our 24-hour call center if you need any assistance with your HVAC system.

Indoor Air Quality

How to Prepare for Fall Allergens

As the summer ends, many Fort Collins residents think about their heating systems. It’s also important to think about the air quality of your home in the autumn months. The fall season brings a unique set of allergens and irritants into your home air supply.

Ragweed and Goldenrod

Goldenrod and ragweed are common plants throughout the United States. Many fall allergy symptoms are the result of exposure to the pollen of these two. While much of this pollen is outdoors, it can also make its way inside as people enter and exit your home. As the season progresses, the amount of pollen in your indoor air increases if it is not addressed.

Dust and Dust Mites

Due to the changing seasons, there may have been some time when you did not need to heat or cool your home. During those weeks, dust and dust mites collected in your ductwork. Now the evenings are getting colder. Soon, your heating system will kick on, spreading dust through the vents. It is very common for sensitive to people to have an allergy attack at the beginning of the heating season.

How to Prepare for Fall Allergens

Getting dust and irritants out of your home is key to improving your air quality. A basic step you can take is increasing the amount of vacuuming. You will want to use a vacuum with a strong filter that will pick up pollen, dust particles, and other small irritants. You might want to consider a robotic vacuum that can help you do this on a daily basis.

Another way to address the problem is to have duct cleaning performed by professionals like those at Lion Home Service. We can get the dust out before the heating season begins. You also want to be sure to change your furnace filter regularly or talk to one of our service experts about adding an air purifier to your duct system. These filtration systems remove dust as it travels through your heating and cooling ductwork.

In the Fort Collins area, Lion Home Service is ready to help you with all your heating, cooling, indoor air quality, electrical and roofing needs. We have the knowledge and skill to improve your home comfort. Contact Lion Home Service today for more information.

Indoor Air Quality

Do Salt Lamps Really Improve Your Indoor Air Quality?

Pink salt isn’t just for your dinner table anymore — this popular culinary addition has now found its way onto your bedside table, too. But do salt lamps really work to purify the air in your home? Or do these novel decorations offer nothing more than aesthetic appeal? While salt lamps have enjoyed a recent surge in popularity, their air purification claims may be nothing more than well-marketed hype. Let’s take a look at the claims and determine if there is any truth to the salt lamp health craze.

Salt Lamps Claim to Ionize Air

The benefits of air ionization are well documented, ranging from reduction of chronic depression symptoms to improvements in seasonal affective disorder. However, it is unlikely that salt lamps are capable of providing significant air-ionizing benefits. Proponents of salt lamp air purification claim that negative ions released from the lamp’s pink salt work to remove harmful pollution and dust particles from the air.

While negative ions are indeed capable of eradicating dust mites and binding to other particles, this process requires an extremely high-powered ion generator. Because a salt lamp is essentially a light bulb inside a hollow chunk of salt, its ion-generating capabilities are minimal, experts believe.

Negative Ions Make for a Dusty Home

Even if salt lamps are somehow capable of generating negative ions, this phenomenon can negatively impact air quality, experts believe. While negative ions are indeed capable of reducing harmful particles in ambient air, they do so by binding to such particles, causing them to stick to various surfaces throughout your home. The benefit, proponents claim, is that these bound particles make dust cleanup and removal much more efficient. However, many experts believe that the accumulation of these particles can trigger allergy symptoms in more sensitive individuals.

Science Says Salt Lamps Are Bunk

Beyond the ionizing claims, proponents also assert that salt lamps are capable of attracting water vapor toward their salty surfaces. The idea is that pollutants in the ambient air are attracted to water, and as this vapor adheres to the lamp’s surface, pollutants dissociate and dissipate, thereby improving air quality. However, there is little scientific evidence to suggest that water vapor does indeed attract airborne pollutants or that the scant heat produced by a salt lamp is capable of dissociating them.

Your Air Quality Professionals in Fort Collins

When it comes to maintaining high-quality air inside your home, one of the most effective things you can do is work with a knowledgeable HVAC company. At Lion Home Service, we know your home is an investment, and you deserve to enjoy that investment in good health. Whether you need heating and cooling service, duct cleaning, and repair, septic service, roof installation, and repair or certified electricians, we provide the service you need. We are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Contact Lion Home Service today for more information.

Indoor Air Quality

4 Helpful Indoor Air Quality Tips

The quality of the indoor air in your home determines how well you breathe each day and the cleanliness of your surroundings. Many residents struggle to protect their air from contaminants, pollutants, and allergens that enter the building. Here are a few indoor air quality tips to utilize that should prove to be helpful for your Fort Collins home.

1. Use Green Cleaning Products

Many people don’t realize how many chemicals and toxins circulate throughout the building when they clean their home. Due to the different types of cleaning products that are used to wipe down various surfaces, harmful chemicals can spread. Opt for using green cleaning products that are made from natural ingredients to protect the air quality in the building. You can also rely on household cleaners like vinegar and baking soda to remove grime throughout the space.

2. Ventilate the House

Proper airflow is necessary to improve the quality of the air. Proper airflow also lets dust, particles, and allergens exit the home. Open the doors and windows throughout the day to remove stagnant air and refresh the space. If you live in a downtown area or a busy city, be specific about the time of day when you open your windows and doors to prevent pollutants from entering the home.

3. Replace the Air Filter

Many people forget to replace their air filters every few months, which can cause dust, pet hair, and allergens to circulate after the particles are trapped. Replace the air filter every two to three months, depending on how much the HVAC system is used. The filters can also be regularly cleaned according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

4. Purchase a Salt Lamp

Salt lamps are increasing in popularity because they fight positively charged ions that lead to allergies. Residents can also experience relief with their respiratory issues or asthma.

Quality AC Repair

Contact Lion Home Service in Fort Collins today to learn more about how you can improve the quality of the air in your home with the help of one of our service experts. We also offer heating, cooling, electrical, roofing and water heater services.